Champions | Lyon surprises ‘the Italian’

first_imgGoals1-0, 30 ‘: Lucas Tousart As expected, the tables changed in the second half. Juventus was forced to advance lines, and Rudi García, showing off his defensive label, delayed the team about 20 meters to tie the result. It was no longer the Lyon of the first half that reached all duels and attacked the backlash with great sufficiency.The match began to be in the boots of Paulo Dybala. The Argentine had been missing in the first half, but with a much more dominating Juventus, began to appear between the lines and punish Lyon. A side center ended up in his boots, but the shot went off touching the post. Virtually every occasion of Sarri’s started from him.In the final minutes, lJuventus squeezed more than normal, but Lyon contained all the rush of the Italians. Cristiano Ronaldo requested a penalty from Denayer, but the Belgian collided shoulder to shoulder with the former Madrid. Gil Manzano annulled a goal from Dybala almost at the end for offside and Lyon ended up surprising Juve. ChangesRamsey (61 ‘, Pjanić), Martin Terrier (65 ‘, Karl Toko Ekambi), Higuain (69 ‘, Square), Tete (77 ‘, Dubois), Federico Bernardeschi (77 ‘, Rabiot), Joachim Andersen (80 ‘, Cornet) CardsReferee: Jesús Gil ManzanoVAR Referee: Juan Martínez MunueraMarcelo (27 ‘, Yellow) Cornet (60 ‘, Yellow The Lyon of the great European nights has returned. The set of Rudi García surprised Juventus with a lonely goal from Lucas Tousart, and faces the return with advantage in a tie that started as one of the most unequal of all the round of 16.The clear favoritism of Juventus was evident in the absence of an hour of the game with the eleven of Lyon. Rudi García decided to bet on a defense of three centrals to stop Dybala and Cristiano, with the novelty of Guimaraes, who debuted in the Champions League forming the double local pivot with Tousart. For its part, Sarri lined a 4-3-3, with the inclusion of Rabiot in the center of the field and with Square on the right side to defend the area of ​​influence of Aouar in the left sector of Lyon.It mattered little that Juventus came as a Series A leader and that Lyon was in low hours. The Champions does not understand performance in local competitions, and that was demonstrated again in today’s game. Although Sarri’s dominated the first ten minutes, enclosing a fairly passive Lyon, as the minutes passed, the French team broke loose and began to believe that it could defeat a superior rival. Cristiano warned with a poisoned center-chut in the first minutes, but it was a mirage.The good work of Lyon, with a system of three centrals that plugged the sides of Juventus on the ball, found its fruits in the 31st minute. Aouar, a player who the fan asks for a step forward in the big appointments, made a play mark of the house on the left and attended Tousart. The midfielder of Lyon, so criticized in recent months, marks for the second consecutive year in the second round, after having already scored Barcelona last season.The nerves began to settle in Juventus, unable to draw a single danger attack, beyond two Cristiano Ronaldo centers. In fact, Olympique de Lyon found a highway on the right side. Dubois, right lane, always received brand free, and Alex Sandro, very pressured at the start of the ball, did not receive a single help from Rabiot. There, both the side of Lyon and Toko-Ekambi, signed two clear occasions before the break, but the former Villarreal could not score when shooting high two shots could well have carried more danger on the goal defended by Szczęsny.last_img read more

Arsenal team v Monaco: Outcast gets chance to impress?

first_imgHaving won seven of their last eight games, Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger will be going into the first leg of their Champions League last 16 clash with Monaco confident his side can claim a result.The Gunners will be face a French side in good nick too, with Leonardo Jardim’s men losing just once in their last eight matches.And it’s unlikely Wenger will take his foot off the gas against Monaco, with minimal changes expected to his side which defeated Crystal Palace, just about, at the weekend.How Arsenal could line up against Monaco:Now Wojciech Szczesny has been usurped David Ospina in Wenger’s Premier League plans it’s likely the Polish shot-stopper will don the gloves in the Champions League for the foreseeable future, while ahead of him Hector Bellerin, if fit, could come in for Calum Chambers.Elsewhere, Theo Walcott could be handed a start as he looks to continue his return to fitness with Danny Welbeck dropping to the bench to accommodate him. Wojciech Szczesny celebrates with Alex Oxlade-Chamberlain 1last_img read more

The Apache Hadoop project took off in enterprises

The Apache Hadoop project took off in enterprises

first_imgThe Apache Hadoop project took off in enterprises over a fairly short period of time. Four or five years ago, Hadoop was just becoming a “thing” for enterprise data processing and experimentation. MapReduce was at the heart of that thing, and Spark was still only a research project at the University of California at Berkeley. Soon after, though, if you were doing “Big Data,” you were using Hadoop.Spark wasn’t even an Apache project when Cloudera, Hortonworks and MapR were already in full business swing in 2013 with Hadoop offerings. Only two years ago did it graduate to be a top-level project.Today, Spark is a part of most Big Data conversations, as is evidenced by how many vendors are offering integrations, or are planning them in the near future. Large enterprises, such as Toyota, Palantir, Netflix and Goldman Sachs, are embracing the technology.(Related: A detailed look at Spark 1.6) Is this uptake at the expense of Hadoop? That’s a larger question, but to begin with, it’s become clear that Spark is replacing MapReduce. Anand Venugopal, head of product for StreamAnalytix at Impetus Technologies, said he believes this is the case.“The MapReduce computing paradigm is likely going to get replaced by Spark as the distributed compute model overall for any workload,” he said. “There’s one metric I use [when deciding what to support], which is, what is the number of customers that tell us ‘We don’t want to talk until you have Spark?’ That same metric is used for any technology: Is there a critical mass of customers who have a seriously broad decision-making body in the enterprise customer that has committed itself to a particular enterprise technology?”He went on to state that this critical mass currently exists in Spark, and that his company’s streaming analytics platform is bringing support online in the first quarter of 2016.Ajay Anand, vice president of products for Kyvos Insights, said, “Most customers expect to see Spark support in the road map, and we are definitely embracing it along with Hadoop. From my perspective, we look at what is the problem we’re looking to solve, and what is the right technology that is mature enough to help us solve that problem.”last_img read more

That means a lot more developers are going to be u

That means a lot more developers are going to be u

first_imgThat means a lot more developers are going to be using these platforms – like it or not. Sorting through the hype is no easy challenge, as even the definitions of “low-code” and “high productivity” themselves seem muddled.Although the term “low-code app development” is fairly new, as mentioned before, the concept is not. Rapid Application Development (RAD) has been around for well over a decade, and Business Process Management (BPM), the ongoing methodology to automate all ad hoc business processes, first gained popularity in the 1990s. Today’s low-code solutions aim to extend the benefits of application platform-as-a-service tools (aPaaS), accelerating app delivery by alleviating the need for developers to spend time manually coding an app from scratch that is made up of common features and components by providing templates to drag-and-drop pre-built elements and objects. And then there are no code platforms, gaining in power and popularity and blurring the line with low code.The premise is simple—give developers the tools they need to quickly create, as well as run applications—but the language surrounding it is anything but. Take hpaPaaS (high-productivity application platform-as-a-service), a visual, model-driven approach to enable a broad range of individuals to build and deploy apps, including citizen developers. Not to be outdone by hcaPaaS (high-control application platform-as-a-service), high-productivity platforms are geared to professional developers, giving them more control over their work.And don’t forget about the back-end and front-end components that make up these solutions. When it comes to the back end, acronyms and marketing-speak abound. Some analysts have coined the term “serverless” to describe the infrastructure, as well as cloud-native solutions and microservices. In the acronym department is the umbrella under which you’ll find backend-as-a-service (BaaS) or function-as-a-service (FaaS).On the front end, things haven’t changed much. Developers still must build apps that deliver a pleasing user interface for a good user experience (UI/UX). Most of the solutions provide point-and-click and drag-and-drop capabilities to speed development. And most also allow for easy integration of APIs so the app can assimilate different data and capabilities.From 4GLs to BPM to the drag-and-drop world of MADP (Mobile Application Development Platforms) through the multitude of “as a Service” acronyms, low-code platforms—and their acronyms and marketing-speak— are here to stay and appear to be poised to accelerate the time it takes to build and deploy powerful, modern apps. Each new—and not so new—technology trend brings its own language, complete with acronyms, jargon and marketing-speak. Consulting services website Connet lists more than 3,000 computer acronyms. Here we are going to focus on one of tech’s current hot topics: Low-code high-productivity application development platforms. Acronyms are flying: RMAD, RADP, LCDP, MADP, hpaPaaS and more. Some of the acronyms may be new, and marketers are spinning the terms “low code” and “high productivity” in new ways, but these technologies have been around. For a long time.You could say that almost every innovation in software is about “low code” and “high productivity.” Even going all the way back to 1972, when the programming language C came on the scene, it was a radical departure from predecessors COBOL and FORTRAN in terms of the amount of code required and readability. Another significant breakthrough in usability came in 1981, when James Martin coined the term 4GL (Fourth Generation Programming Language) in his aptly titled book, Application Development Without Programmers. 4GLs aimed to enhance programmer efficiency with a more natural language syntax and tooling that utilized GUIs (Graphical User Interfaces). Some even argue that modern low code tools are simply the current evolution of 4GLs.So why is the tech community so focused on these platforms now? With the amount of data growing exponentially, and with virtually everyone carrying a digital device, the pressure to develop applications to put all that data to good use has never been greater. At the same time, while demand for developers keeps growing, the size of the talent pool isn’t keeping pace with that demand. Recent research by The App Association estimates that nearly 250,000 developer jobs remain unfilled today in the U.S. alone, with that number expected to triple in the next three years.Progress conducted a survey of more than 5,500 web and mobile applications developers to gauge their workloads and sentiment about low-code, high-productivity platforms on the market today. With 39% of developers expected to build 2 to 4 new apps in the next 12 months, and 14% expected to build 5 to 10 new apps over the same period, the survey validated that developers indeed face greater pressure than ever to produce apps—fast.That same survey also showed some skepticism among developers about these platforms. Two-thirds (66%) had negative feelings about them, mostly due to loss of control of their code. But with market researchers expecting explosive growth in this area the next few years, these platforms are here to stay. According to new research by MarketsandMarkets, their market size is expected to grow from $4.32 billion in 2017 to $27.23 billion by 2022, a compound annual growth rate of 44.49%.last_img read more