Its always easier to raise money when you dont n

Its always easier to raise money when you dont n

first_imgIt’s always easier to raise money when you don’t need it. That’s why Chef, yesterday, announced the latest round of series E funding worth US$40 million. That money will be used to help fuel growth inside the DevOps startup, said Barry Crist, CEO of Chef.That growth is “unequivocally hockey-sticking. 2015 is setting up to be a record year in terms of customers, partnerships and revenue. Most importantly, what’s happening to the rate of growth is as we’re getting larger, our rate of growth is accelerating,” he said.(Related: MariaDB adds Chef support)“This is an inflection point for Chef as a company. Our innovation is becoming the primary bridge between traditional IT and new IT in the enterprise,” said Crist. “Today we enter a new era as the automation control plane for digital-first organizations everywhere, and this new capital will help us take DevOps mainstream.” The company began investing in Europe last year, said Crist, and global operations are a source of that expansion. This recent round of financing may be used to help with that global expansion, he said.“In some areas we’ll be aggressive—mostly in geographic expansion. We want to continue to invest in containers, compliance and velocity. We think our job is really to build a security model for those areas that are heavily development-focused. And we’ll save some money for acquisitions, too,” he said.One of those areas where Crist plans to focus is healing a major headache for enterprises. Compliance regulations result in a great deal of red tape for developers, admins and managers alike. He thinks that Chef is the solution to that problem.“All that red tape in compliance really slows companies down,” said Crist. “Velocity is the competitive currency. This is familiar ground to us. If you can define infrastructure as code and rapidly provision it, that was a whopper for enterprises. Compliance needs to get defined in code so you can do compliance checks in the same way you would do a functional check at build. The more frequently you release software, the more frequently you’re checking compliance.”To this end, last year, Chef hired Justin Arbuckle, former chief architect at GE Capital. Arbuckle is charged with building Chef’s compliance solution, said Crist.last_img read more

HBO The reign of one of historys most cunning and

HBO The reign of one of historys most cunning and

first_imgHBO The reign of one of history’s most cunning and deplorable politicians came to an end on Sunday night as Selina Meyer and the Veep crew said goodbye after seven seasons, years spent pummeling the American political system and raising the bar for smart, filthy, and hilarious comedy. The morning after the finale aired, Uproxx spoke with Veep showrunner and series finale writer/director David Mandel about the fan response, lessons learned from working on Seinfeld at the end of its run, and deciding to introduce consequences and closure to the show’s final minutes. How much attention are you paying today to critical reaction and fan reaction? I’m not gonna lie, I look at everything. I do. I will say that I came to it a little slower today. I’m quite happy with it and I guess maybe on some level it made me a little more nervous to kind of check. [Laughs] When I did sort of finally check I got the sense that people like it. It would not have changed my opinion, though. I guess I would’ve been disappointed if it had not been well-received. I’m never going to change things for those reasons. When you’re crafting the finale — and this has been a long time coming — how much is it trying to please the fans and how much is it that you’re trying to please yourselves? Zero. I mean, I’m sorry. I’m not trying to dismiss the fans. I love the fans. But you know, if I was doing what the fans wanted, I mean I guess Dan and Amy would have been married in the final episode. I’m not quite sure. [Laughs] All I’ve ever really tried to do is make myself and a couple of my high school friends and college roommates laugh. I mean, that sounds crazy, but that’s who I’m writing for and it serves me well. Seems like it’s working for you. Julia [Louis-Dreyfus] is in there too. I wanted me to be happy and her to be happy and I just figured the chips will fall. Can you talk a little bit about the challenge of dealing with the existence of the Trump administration over these last two seasons? With season six, obviously, he was elected while we were shooting…And then, obviously, this year isn’t necessarily about the White House, it was about running for the White House. It was during the year of Julia’s cancer that we had broken the season and really kind of had some episodes written that, I will admit, we had to step back and kind of go, boy, politics are changing. I think the show needs to change to reflect this even though we’re living through it. I didn’t want to do Trump jokes because they’ll get stale, but we did have to examine the sort of symptoms that led to Trump and the things that Trump is, I guess, sort of causing. So sort of trying to do everything about Trump except Trump, because it’s not just Trump, it’s this kind of leadership all across the globe. Why, all of a sudden, in the 21st century, are authoritarian governments and authoritarian leaders rising up to be stronger than they’ve been in years? What’s going on? And trying to sort of reflect all of that. And so, it was a huge challenge. But if you look back… If you go back to whatever, you know, season two or three, so many of those episodes almost have been invalidated by Trump. I don’t want to say invalidated, but there’s really no other word. Do you know what I mean? You look back and just go, if that was now, the show would just seem like it was taking place in some sort of weird, simpler ernate universe. Whether you like Trump or not I don’t care for him you cannot not admit that he has changed politics. I’m not arguing good or bad. It’s changed, though. And because it’s changed, we’ve had to change. Was there ever a point when you had Jonah taking the presidency? No, never. I guess, as cynical a bastard as I am, I never could fully push him into the Oval. I guess it’s interesting, I know there are a lot of people out there going, oh, “Selina should be veep.” Not so much about the final episode, but in the leadup to the final episode where they thought the end was going to be Selina as veep. And in a weird way, she’s done that. We know what that is. But also, she could deal with that. But the more, sort of perfect sort of torture for her was to get it [the Presidency] but to suffer from having gotten it. But for Jonah, a man of his kind of power hungriness? I think the vice presidency was the perfect punishment for him, in a way. [Laughs] Source: UPROXX.COMlast_img read more