The Nodejs and iojs forks of the opensource Jav

The Nodejs and iojs forks of the opensource Jav

first_imgThe Node.js and io.js forks of the open-source JavaScript runtime platform have announced official plans to merge development under the Node.js Foundation.The merger was put to a vote on GitHub by io.js developer Mikeal Rogers, who initially proposed the merger in February, and the io.js technical committee voted to approve the merger yesterday. According to Rogers, the team will continue releasing io.js versions while the convergence takes place, but after the merger is complete, the io.js working groups and technical committee will join the Node.js Foundation under renamed titles.(Related: The future of JavaScript is (almost) now)Rogers said the biggest reason the merger makes sense is because the foundation’s open governance structure is nearly identical to io.js, something the io.js team plans to improve upon further after the merger.“During the process of writing all this [documentation] down, we improved the documentation for most of these policies and made some improvements,” Rogers wrote. “The new ‘converged’ node project will begin with io.js master and port changes from Node.js in for its first release target.”The merger also comes on the heels of Node.js project lead TJ Fontaine announcing he is stepping down from the project and leaving Joyent. Going forward, the Node.js Foundation will govern the project collaboratively with the Node.js and io.js communities. The io.js fork of Node.js gained popularity in December and January based on its open governance, allowing faster decision-making, more current Chrome V8 engine compatibility, and faster support for JavaScript features such as the coming changes in ECMAScript 6.The Node.js Foundation was established with the help of the Linux Foundation back in February, and had its important organizational structure and stewardship questions hashed out at the Node Summit soon after.Rogers confirmed the merger’s approval in a tweet:io.js TC just voted to join the Node Foundation.— Mikeal Rogers (@mikeal) May 13, 2015last_img read more

In the same way he said a technology company is

In the same way he said a technology company is

first_imgIn the same way, he said, a technology company is being paid to do what its customers want, and often is torn between building what they want versus building what it thinks the customer needs. “Often, though, they don’t know how to ask that question,” said Basso.He cited a 2015 Standish Group report that said that only 29% of software projects are successful, and “clear business objectives” were identified as a key factor in project success.“People jump right into requirements,” said Basso, going from what they think their needs are to defining software features without taking time to consider if the software will meet the needs. “But they have to build the right thing. You have to look at the technology part, but you also have to look at the business part.”Basso said there are five steps to ID-GEM. The first is to identify value and a primary business objective. “You want to create users or capture market share,” he said as a simplistic example. “So you can’t put a 17-page login system in place, as your adoption rate will be horrible.” Developers take time to create good working software. They read the requirements, write code, end up with a perfectly functional application, and then someone in the organization realizes that application won’t help the business at all.As CIO and cofounder of Amadeus Consulting, John Basso has seen this time and again over the past 21 years. In that time, his firm has learned how to align software development and business objectives, and now has released ID-GEM, a free planning tool aimed at small- and mid-sized organizations that might not have the expertise to find the business value in a software project.(Related: Requirements must keep pace with agile)“Look at people building a home,” Basso said. “The architect wants to build something to make people happy, but people often ask for illogical things. So you walk in the house and say, ‘Who would build a hallway this narrow?’ It’s illogical.”last_img read more