Daniel’s stunning act of kindness to fan recovering from brain tumour

first_imgStories of Daniel O’Donnell’s care for his fans are legendary.And the singer has yet again put other people before himself with a stunning act of kindness.Brigette Hill, who is recovering from a brain tumour, was devastated when tickets for her idol’s shows in Norwich were sold out. But the singer made her day when he turned up at her care home alone and unannounced to spend time with her and her fellow residents.The 58-year-old has been at the FitzRoy home for about a year and a half after having the tumour removed, and has been working hard on her mobility.Staff at the Fitzroy care home said the visit by the Kincasslagh man on Wednesday was “unbelievable”.“It was absolutely surreal – he turned up completely unannounced,” support worker Nick Jacobs told the Norfolk Eastern Daily Press. “I was in the garden and I could hear this male voice inside and wondered who it was. “Then he just wandered through the garden. He was genuinely the nicest bloke I have ever met – he was so good with the residents and really took his time to speak with them.“He sat outside with Brigette and let us all take photos, and just chatted to her.“We brought out the other residents Linda and Richard and he really spent time with them and let them ask him all sorts of questions.“It meant the world to Brigette because she absolutely idolizes him.“She has his DVD and plays it every day, she is totally besotted with him. “She was in tears and sobbing. The visit has made her whole life.”The meeting came about after Ms Hill’s sister, Lesley Vernon, had tried unsuccessfully to secure tickets to the Theatre Royal shows. She then tried to reach out to see if there was any chance of a signed photograph, but Mr O’Donnell went one step further.“It is unbelievable to turn up here completely alone to do something like that, I don’t know many people who would make that effort.“It is an amazing thing to do,” added Mr Jacobs. “Brigette used to be fairly able-bodied, and her life was completely changed by the tumour.“She spent about 10 months in hospital after having it removed, and when she came to us she was completely immobile.“Now she walks around the house and is getting her independence back. Her determination is so admirable.”Ms Hill said after the meeting: “Seeing Daniel made me feel so happy. I love his music and always dreamed of meeting him.“When I saw Daniel, I was speechless and crying for joy. I’ll never forget it.”Daniel’s stunning act of kindness to fan recovering from brain tumour was last modified: September 24th, 2016 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Analysis Better Schools Housing Prices Require Longer Commutes

Analysis Better Schools Housing Prices Require Longer Commutes

first_img in Daily Dose, Data, Featured Home price Homebuying Homeowner school zone 2017-03-31 Rachel Williams Share Though suburban home prices typically go up in relation to school district quality, according to a recent New York Times analysis, there are some “sweet spots,” where affordable housing doesn’t mean sacrificing a good education.Using data from Redfin, as well as test scores from the Stanford Education Data Archive, Times writers Quoctrung Bui and Conor Dougherty analyzed school quality, home price, and commute time. What they found were a handful of pockets in the San Francisco, Boston, Minneapolis, and Chicago metro areas that still offer quality schools without the high price tag. The catch? They’re further out from the city and require longer commutes.“Living in the suburbs can save money, but residents pay in the form of longer commutes and loss of urban amenities,” Bui and Dougherty wrote.The writers listed Boston as a good example.“In the Boston area (where many suburban school districts are considered first-rate),” the analysis stated, “more expensive school districts like Brookline, Massachusetts, tend to have strong scores and relatively short commutes. Equally good districts, like Lexington, may be cheaper, but people living there face longer commutes.”Bui and Dougherty found that these sweet spots like Lexington are often because, in some cities, residents simply show a preference for urban living—no matter what school quality in the area looks like.“But in some areas–particularly a handful of dense cities with good public transit–the preference for being in the city center seems to outweigh the importance of school quality by a huge margin,” they wrote. “Homes in central city locations are generally more valued than those farther out, and prices in the urban locations have risen far faster than in the suburbs since 2000.”This was seen the most in San Francisco where, even though neighboring cities boast much better school districts, cost per square foot is significantly higher in the city. Minneapolis had the most comparable city vs. suburb prices.“The Bay Area is the most extreme case: Homes in the central city carry such a huge premium that buyers in suburban cities like Albany and San Ramon end up paying several hundred dollars less per square foot even though the schools are significantly better than those in San Francisco.”The public transit is key in these urban-dense cities, and it’s why similar trends can be seen in New York and Boston, too, Bui and Dougherty wrote.“What these cities have in common is that they are less automobile-dominated,” the analysis stated. “They are among the few American cities where a significant share of the population walks, bikes or takes public transit to work. So the lifestyle difference between living in the city and suburbs in those metropolitan areas is much more stark than in other places in America, where nearly everyone drives.”According to Nela Richardson, Chief Economist at Redfin, there are even smaller towns this applies to, too—namely Alexandria, Virginia, and Somerville, Massachusetts, which Richardson called “dense transit-friendly suburbs.” These are experiencing price increases tied to density, not school quality.“But in places like Phoenix, L.A., Dallas and Atlanta,” she said, “the trade-off between living in the city and the suburbs is not as great, so why not go to where the best schools are and homes cost the least?”According to the article, economists estimate that suburbs see a 2.5 percent jump in housing prices with every 5-percent increase in test scores.center_img March 31, 2017 598 Views Analysis: Better Schools, Housing Prices Require Longer Commuteslast_img read more